2000-Level Courses

2018/2019

2100-650  Archaeology and World Prehistory (Professor Timmins)

The field of archaeology with emphasis on the major discoveries of the discipline. Topics include the evolution of humans, their spread throughout the world, the origins of agriculture, urbanization, and the development of early civilizations. Major archaeological sites like Olduvai Gorge, Stonehenge, Giza, Ur and Teotihuacan will be discussed.

Course value: 1.0
Antirequisites: none
Prerequisites: none

This course is ideal for students with no background in anthropology.

This course does not count towards any of the Anthropology modules; only the Anthropology Minor.

2018/2019
Fall/Winter: Distance Studies     Professor P. Timmins

2101B-650  Great Archaeological Sites  (New!)  (Professor Timmins)

An examination of spectacular archaeological sites around the world, including many on the UNESCO World Heritage List. The course covers sites of complex hunter-gatherers and farmers, and early states and empires in Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Aegean, Asia and Mesoamerica, the Andes and the Classical World.

Course value: 0.5
Antirequisites: None
Prerequistes: None

This course does not count towards any of the Anthropology modules; only the Anthropology Minor.

2018/2019
Winter: Distance Studies      Professor P. Timmins
      

2216F-650  Cultures of Latin America  (Professor Premat)

The cultural history of Latin American societies. Topics include the historical formation of indigenous communities, and a wide variety of contemporary social problems in Latin America.

Course value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2216F/G
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 essay course.

2018/2019
Fall: Distance Studies      Professor A. Premat

2219G-001  Cultures of the Middle East  (Professor Farah)

A critical examination of approaches that tend to homogenize and dehistoricize Middle Eastern peoples. The course provides an historical overview that reveals regional heterogeneity, and shifts in peoples, powers and borders. Due to the immensity and complexity of the region, the thematic focus will change regularly.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): None
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 essay course.

2018/2019
Winter: Wed 1:30-4:30      Professor R. Farah

2222G-200  Debates in Sociocultural Anthropology  (Professor Premat)

Sociocultural Anthropologists commonly debate the foundations of their discipline. What are the goals of Sociocultural Anthropology? How should we be doing it, and why? For whom do we do it? This course contextualizes such key debates focusing especially on what they tell us about the discipline’s past, present, and future.

Antirequisite(s): None
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1020 (formerly 1020E) or Anthropology 1025F/G.

2018/2019
Winter: Thu 1:30-3:30pm + 1.0 hour online   Classroom: UCC 67     Professor A. Premat

2226B-001  Biological Anthropology  (Professor Colquhoun)

A survey of the major areas of biological anthropology, including heredity, paleo-anthropology, human adaptability and variability, and growth and development.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): None
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1020 (formerly 1020E) or Anthropology 1025F/G and Anthropology 1026F/G.

2018/2019
Winter: Tue 1:30-4:30pm     Classroom SSC 2257    Professor I. Colquhoun

2229F-001  Principles of Archaeology  (Professor Ferris)

This course provides an overview of the goals, theory and analytical methods of archaeology as practised by anthropologists. The course serves to provide a basic appreciation of how one is able to go from the material remains of past peoples to statements about the nature of their cultural systems, and also, how archaeologists are uniquely poised to address certain general questions of concern to all anthropologists.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): None
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1020 (formerly 1020E) or Anthropology 1025F/G and Anthropology 1026F/G.

2018/2019
Fall: Mon 1:30-4:30      Classroom: UCC 2257      Professor N. Ferris

2234F-001  Andean Prehistory  (Professor Millaire)

This course will focus primarily on the prehistory of the Peruvian Andes and Coast, with some overlap into Ecuador, Bolivia, Chile and Amazonia. We will study the area's archaeological record in some detail, touching on a variety of themes that are of general archaeological interest, e.g. agricultural origins, trade, the rise of complex societies, the role of religious ideology, and the interpretation of archaeological evidence.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): None
Prerequiste(s): Anthropology 1020 (formerly 1020E) or Anthropology 1025F/G and Anthropology 1026F/G, or Anthropology 2100, or First Nations Studies 1020E.

2018/2019
Fall: Tue 9:30-12:30      Classroom: SSC 2257      Professor J.F. Millaire

2238B-001  Reading Life and Death through the Human Body  (Professor Waters-Rist)

While alive our bodily tissues store a tremendous amount of information. These clues can be used to tell a lot about a person’s life and death. This information is explored in three contexts: Living Individuals, Recently Deceased Individuals (focus on forensic applications), and Older Deceased Individuals (focus on archaeological applications).

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): None
Prerequiste(s): Any first year Social Science, Health Sciences, or Science course.

2018/2019
Winter: Wed 10:30-1:30     Classroom: NS 7     Professor A. Waters-Rist

2239B-001 Mummies: The Scientific and Cultural Analysis of Human Mummies (Prof Nelson)

Mummies are of interest to archaeologists and to the general public. Mummies are people and they speak to us from across the centuries. This course takes an interdisciplinary, scientific and cultural approach to the study of human mummies to discuss issues of ethics, science and cross-cultural perspectives on death.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): None
Prerequisite(s): Any first year Social Science, Health Sciences or Science course. 

2018/2019
Winter: Wed 7:00-10:00pm     Classroom: 2032   Professor A. Nelson

2245F-001  Anthropological Approaches to Language  (Professor Bell)

Culture is investigated using linguistic methods and techniques. Topics include: the analysis of lexical sets, cognitive categories, language as a symbolic communicative process, non-verbal communication, conversational analysis.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): None
Prerequisite(s): One of: Anthropology 1020 (formerly 1020E), Anthropology 1025F/G, Anthropology 1027A/B or Linguisitics 2288A/B.

2018/2019
Fall: Tue 1:30-3:30, Thu 12:30-1:30     Classroom: B&GS 1056     Professor L. Bell

2249F-001  Discourse Analysis  (Professor Pennesi)

Analysis of the contexts in which sentences occur and of the communicative functions they carry. Topics include: theme/rheme, information structure, deixis, presupposition, conversational implicature, speech acts and conversational analysis.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): None
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1027A/B or Linguistics 2288A/B.

2018/2019
Fall: Mon 10:30-12:30, Wed 10:30-11:30      UCC 66     Professor K. Pennesi

2252F-001  Languages in Canada  (Professor Pennesi)

We examine languages and dialects that are associated with particular regions, cultures, and/or ethnic groups in Canada, including First Nations languages, French, English and immigrant languages. We consider language structures, variation and ways that languages relate to the identity of groups which speak them.

Course value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2152A/B, the former Linguistics 2185A/B, 2285F/G.
Prerequisite(s): One of Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E), Anthropology 1025F/G, Anthropology 1027A/B or First Nations Studies 1020E.

2018/2019
Fall: Lecture Tue 9:30-11:30, Tutorial Thu 11:30-12:30   Classroom: SH 3305  Professor Pennesi

2265F-650  Primate Behaviour  (Professor Colquhoun)

This course considers the behavioral patterns, and diversity, exhibited across species of the Order Primates. Critical examination of theoretical models developed to explain primate behavior is emphasized. Topics covered, using species comparisons, include socioecological contexts of primate behavior, reproduction, growth and development, kinship and dominance, communication and cognition.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): None
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 essay course.

2018/2019
Winter: Distance Studies     Professor I. Colquhoun

2267B-650  Anthropology of Zoos  (New!)  (Professor Colquhoun)

Modern zoos characterize themselves as key players in conserving endangered species. But, is this message getting across to zoo visitors? This course utilizes anthropological and interdisciplinary approaches to assess key aspects of zoo-based conservation action, and the extent to which zoos can generate public engagement in 21st century conservation concerns.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): None
Prerequisite(s): None

2018/2019
Winter: Distance Studies     Professor I. Colquhoun

2272F-650  Anthropology of Tourism  (Puppe)

This course examines various aspects of tourism from an anthropological point of view. Topics will include the cultural effects of tourism on both hosts and guests, on the political and economic issues involved in tourism, on the connection between tourism and environmental concerns, and on conflict over local resources.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): None
Prerequiste(s): At least a 0.5 essay course in any faculty.

2018/2019  Fall: Distance Studies       Professor: I. Puppe

2272G-650  Anthropology of Tourism  (Kennedy)

This course examines various aspects of tourism from an anthropological point of view. Topics will include the cultural effects of tourism on both hosts and guests, on the political and economic issues involved in tourism, on the connection between tourism and environmental concerns, and on conflict over local resources.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): None
Prerequiste(s): At least a 0.5 essay course in any faculty.

2018/2019  Fall: Distance Studies       Professor: C. Kennedy

2275A-001  Anthropology of Sex and Gender  (New!)  (Professor Bell)

This course explores sex and gender as concepts that are socially and culturally constructed within and across cultures. Emphasizing critical and thoughtful reading, analysis, and discussion, the course addresses how shared understandings of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion and class affect people’s experiences of their social worlds.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): None
Prerequiste(s): None

2018/2019
Fall: Thu 2:30-5:30     Classroom: TBA     Professor L. Bell

2280G-650  Economic Anthropology  (Professor Kennedy)

This course explores the economic lives of people across a variety of cultures. Topics will include social and political economy, economics and morality, gifts and exchange, labour and production, commodities and consumption, fair trade, and concepts of land and mortgage.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): None.
Prerequiste(s): At least 0.5 essay course in any faculty.

2018/2019
Winter:  Distance Studies   Professor: C. Kennedy

2282G-650  Anthropology of Migration  (Larkin)

This course will examine human migration from an anthropological perspective that includes a brief historical overview of human mobility, case studies from around the world, and theoretical attempts to explain and predict human migration.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): None.
Prerequiste(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 essay course.

2018/2019
Winter: Distance Studies     Professor: S. Larkin

2283F-001  Refugees and the Displaced   (Professor Farah)

This course examines populations forcibly uprooted from their original habitats due to armed conflict, famine, environmental disasters and 'development.' It emphasizes the need to examine displacement in specific contexts. Topics include: the impact of displacement on society and culture, 'home' and exile, humanitarian aid, resistance and resilience in host-countries.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): None.
Prerequisite(s): Any Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 essay course.

2018/2019
Fall:  Wed 1:30-4:30     Classroom: AHB 1B04      Professor R. Farah