Western University AntropologyWestern Social Science

Welcome to Anthropology at Western!

This is the place to learn more about the different first year course options we offer, why you should consider choosing one or several of these options, and how they fit into Anthropology’s undergraduate modules.  If you can’t find what you are looking for, don’t hesitate to get in touch by emailing us at anthro-ugrad-office@uwo.ca

First Year Course Options for 2018-19

Anthropology 1020
An engaging full year (1.0 credit) non-essay course comprised of four six-week sections, each featuring lectures from specialist instructors and weekly tutorials.

An introduction to anthropology (the study of human beings, past and present) co-taught by specialists in biological anthropology, archaeology, linguistic anthropology, and sociocultural anthropology. Students will explore anthropological approaches to and findings concerning: human evolution; variation and adaptation; diverse forms of social, political, and economic organization; culture; ritual; language; communication; identity; gender; health; social inequality; and globalization.

Two sections are offered in 2018/2019:
Section 001 is Mondays 1:30-3:30 plus one tutorial hour of your choice on Wednesdays.
Section 002 is Tuesdays 9:30-11:30 plus one tutorial hour of your choice on Thursdays.

Antirequisites: Anthropology 1025F/G and 1026F/G.

Anthropology 1020 is an excellent complement to introductory courses in the Arts and Humanities, Psychology, Sociology, Geography, History, Political Science, Economics, Biology, Health Sciences, Women’s Studies, and other disciplines that focus on different aspects of the human experience.

Anthropology 1025F/G
An introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology through a single term (0.5 credit) essay course, allowing you the opportunity to supplement in-class learning with an independent writing project.

An introduction to the basic concepts used in the anthropological study of non-Western social and cultural institutions that focuses on the unity and diversity of human experience. Topics include: kinship, economics, politics, religion, and the present-day conditions of indigenous societies. The ethnography of various peoples is discussed.

Three sections are offered in 2018/19:

Fall term Monday evenings 7-10.
Fall term online through Distance Studies.
Winter term Mondays 3:30-5:30 and Wednesdays 4:30-5:30.

Antirequisites: Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E).

Anthropology 1025F/G is an excellent complement to courses in the Arts and Humanities, Psychology, Sociology, Geography, History, Political Science, Economics, Global Studies, Management, and other disciplines that focus on different aspects of the contemporary human experience in a rapidly changing world.

Anthropology 1026F/G
An introduction to Archaeology and Biological Anthropology through a single term (0.5 credit) essay course, allowing you the opportunity to supplement in-class learning with an independent writing project.

An introduction to aspects of biological anthropology and archaeology which help us to understand the place of humankind in nature. Topics to be covered include heredity, human evolution and variability, archaeological method, the development of culture, the domestication of plants and animals, and the rise of civilization and the state.

Three sections are offered in 2018/19:
Fall term Wednesdays 3:30-6:30.
Winter term online through Distance Studies.
Winter term Monday evenings 7-10.

Antirequisite: Anthropology 1020 (formerly Anthropology 1020E).

Anthropology 1026 is an excellent complement to courses in the Arts and Humanities, Classics, History, Biology, Health Sciences, Political Science, Economics, and other disciplines that draw attention to the contemporary relevance of the human past.
      

Anthropology 1027A/B
An introduction to Linguistics through a single term (0.5 credit) non-essay course, allowing you to learn and practice the fundamentals of Linguistics (through lectures and tutorials) in preparation for further studies in either Linguistics or Linguistic Anthropology.

Introduction to basic concepts and methods of modern linguistics. Topics include articulatory and acoustic phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. This course is a prerequisite for subsequent linguistics courses in the Department of Anthropology and/or the Linguistics program.

Two sections are offered in 2018/19:
Fall term Wednesdays 4:30-6:30 plus one tutorial hour on Wednesdays.
Winter term Tuesdays 3:30-5:30 plus one tutorial hour on Thursdays.

Antirequisite: Linguistics 22288A/B.

Anthropology 1027 is an excellent complement to courses in the Arts and Humanities, Modern Languages, Psychology, Health Studies, and other disciplines that focus on different aspects of the contemporary human experience in a rapidly changing world.