Western University AntropologyWestern Social Science

2000 Level Courses

2100 - Archaeology and World Prehistory

The field of archaeology with emphasis on the major discoveries of the discipline. Topics include the evolution of humans, their spread throughout the world, the origins of agriculture, urbanization, and the development of early civilizations. Major archaeological sites like Olduvai Gorge, Stonehenge, Giza, Ur and Teotihuacan will be discussed.  1.0 course.

Antirequisite(s): none
Prerequisite(s): none

This course is ideal for students with no background in anthropology.
Note: This course counts towards only one anthropology module: the Anthropology Minor.

2017-2018
Fall/Winter:  Section 650 Distance Studies    Instructor: P. Timmins

2151A - Language, Gender and Sexuality

This is a general interest course. Students who want credit towards Anthropology and Linguistics modules should take 2251F.

This course explores the relationship between language and sex/gender systems from a critical linguistic anthropology perspective. Areas investigated include: language and gender stereotypes; gender variation in language usage; power and women’s status; and male vs female communicative styles in different contexts. 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour. 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2251F/G, Linguistics 2185A/B, 2286F/G, 2287F/G.
Prerequiste(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science course.

2017-2018
Fall: Lecture section 001: Tue 1:30-3:30 pm   Classroom: UCC-67    Instructor: T. Granadillo
       Tutorial section 002: Thu 3:30-4:30 pm   Classroom: SSC-3227 (updated Sept.11)

2201F - Urban Anthropology

Today, with over half the world population living in cities, urban field sites have become the norm for many anthropologists. Through case studies, this course introduces key topics, debates, and insights associated with urban anthropolgy and invites reflection on the contributions anthropology can make to urban studies. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 essay course.

2017-2018
Fall: Mon 11:30 am-1:30 pm and Wed 12:30-1:30 Classroom: SSC-3102 (updated Sept.11)  Instructor: A. Premat

2211G - Cultures of the Caribbean

An introduction to the Caribbean and circum-Caribbean, emphasizing religion, aesthetic styles, current political processes, and relationships of the region and its peoples to Canada. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2211F/G
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 essay course.

2017-2018
Winter:  Section 650: Distance Studies    Instructor: S. Larkin

2212F - Cultures of the Pacific

The cultures of Polynesia, Micronesia and Melanesia with an emphasis on indigenous social structures. Other topics include ecology and economy, male-female relations, ritual and cosmology, hierarchical and egalitarian political systems, Pacific history, and contemporary political and economic issues. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2212F/G.
Prerequiste(s): Any first year Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 essay course.

2017-2018
Fall: Tue 12:30-1:30 pm and Wed 12:30-2:30 pm Classroom: P&AB-34 Instructor: D. Jorgensen

2217G - First Nations Traditional Cultures of Canada

Cultural and linguistic areas of Canada, subsistence patterns, social and political organization, religion, ethnohistory of the fur trade and Metis, treaties, accessing First Nations viewpoints. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2217F/G
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 essay course.

  • Course Outline coming soon
2017-2018
Winter: Fri 11:30-2:30pm   Classroom: SH-3317   Instructor: Natahnee Winder (updated Sept.11)

2218F - Contemporary First Nations Issues in Canada

Education, land claims, sovereignty, social justice, hunting and fishing rights, co-management of resources, spirituality, pow-wows, oral history, language maintenance; media representation, cross-cultural mis-communication, Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 2218F/G
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 essay course.

2017-2018
Fall: Wed 7:00-10:00pm   Classroom: WL-258   Instructor: Natahnee Winder

2222G - Debates in Sociocultural Anthropology

Sociocultural Anthropologists commonly debate the foundations of their discipline. What are the goals of Sociocultural Anthropology? How should we be doing it, and why? For whom do we do it? This course contextualizes such key debates focusing especially on what they tell us about the discipline’s past, present, and future.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1020E or ANTH 1025F/G.

2017-2018
Winter: Mon 2:30-5:30 pm   Classroom: SSC-2257   Instructor: A. Premat

2223F - Doing Fieldwork in Anthropology

This is a ‘blended course’ which means that the delivery of course material will occur both in class and online.

This course will explore the methodology of anthropological fieldwork. The emphasis will be less on reading about anthropology and more on actually doing what anthropologists do. Assignments will focus on participant observation and include talking with people, observing what they are doing and taking part in their activities. 3 lecture hours. 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequiste(s): Anthropology 1020E or Anthropology 1025F/G.

2017-2018
Fall, Section 200 (blended format): Class: Fri 10:30 am-12:30 pm and online     Instructor: S. Larkin

2226A - Biological Anthropology

A survey of the major areas of biological anthropology, including heredity, paleo-anthropology, human adaptability and variability, and growth and development. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1020E or ANTH 1025F/G and ANTH 1026F/G.

2017-2018
Fall: Thu 2:30-5:30pm   Classroom: SSC-2257   Instructor I. Colquhoun

2229G - Principles of Archaeology

This course provides an overview of the goals, theory and analytical methods of archaeology as practised by anthropologists. The course serves to provide a basic appreciation of how one is able to go from the material remains of past peoples to statements about the nature of their cultural systems, and also, how archaeologists are uniquely poised to address certain general questions of concern to all anthropologists. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1020E or ANTH 1025F/G and ANTH 1026F/G.

2017-2018
Winter: Tue 2:30-4:30pm and Thu 3:30-4:30 pm   Classroom: UCC-63   Instructor: P. Timmins

2230G - Arctic Archaeology

An overview and critical evaluation of reconstructions of past ways of life in the Arctic. The course will introduce prehistoric cultures as archaeologically defined and examine the use of ethnography in archaeological interpretation, the role of cultural contact in culture change, and the use of archaeology in constructing contemporary identity. 3 lecture hours. 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequiste(s): Anthropology 1020E or Anthropology 1026F/G.

2017-2018
Winter: Fri 9:30 am-12:30 pm Classroom: SSC-2257 Instructor: L. Hodgetts

2233F - Archaeology of Ontario and the Great Lakes

The prehistoric societies of Ontario and surrounding areas. Topics include the entry of humans into the New World and their arrival in Ontario; development of agriculture; appearance of historic period societies such as the Huron, Neutral and Ojibwa; impact of European settlement and economic systems on native societies. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): FNS 2233F/G
Prerequisite(s):ANTH 1020E or ANTH 1025F/G and ANTH 1026F/G or ANTH 2100 or FNS 1020E.

2017-2018
Fall: Mon 10:30 am-12:30 pm in SSC-2257 and Wed 9:30-10:30 am in SSC-3014 (updated Sept.11) Instructor: P. Timmins

2236B - Human Aging: Bioanthropological Perspectives

This course examines biological changes of the human body from birth to old age, using a systems approach to document and evaluate populational patterns of growth and development. It emphasizes methods used in bioarchaeology to estimate chronological age from calcified tissue and problems associated with senescence (i.e., osteoarthritis and osteoporosis). 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequisite(s): Any one of the following: Anthropology 1020E, 1026F/G, Sociology 1020, 1021E, Biology 1225, 1290B, the former Biology 1222, 1223, 026, Health Sciences 1001A/B and Health Sciences 1002A/B; or the former Health Sciences 1000.

2017-2018
Winter: Wed 2:30-5:30 pm   Classroom: SEB-1059   Instructor: A.Nelson

2238B - Reading Life and Death through the Human Body

While alive our bodily tissues store a tremendous amount of information. These clues can be used to tell a lot about a person’s life and death. This information is explored in three contexts: Living Individuals, Recently Deceased Individuals (focus on forensic applications), and Older Deceased Individuals (focus on archaeological applications).. 3 lecture hours. 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequiste(s): Any first-year Social Science, Health Sciences, or Science course.

2017-2018
Winter: Wed 10:30 am-1:30 pm Classroom: B&GS-0153 Instructor: A. Waters-Rist

2239A - Mummies: The Scientific and Cultural Analysis of Human Mummies

Mummies are of interest to archaeologists and to the general public. Mummies are people and they speak to us from across the centuries. This course takes an interdisciplinary, scientific and cultural approach to the study of human mummies to discuss issues of ethics, science and cross-cultural perspectives on death. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequisite(s): Any first year Social Science, Health Science or Science course. 

2017-2018
Fall: Wed 7:00-10:00 pm   Classroom: SSC-2032   Instructor: A. Nelson

2243F - Applied Linguistics

A survey of practical applications of linguistic theory. Includes discussion of the relevance of psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic research to language teaching and learning, evaluation of language policies, consideration of issues of translation and communicative competence, and the analysis of language use in media, law and medicine. 3 lecture hours. 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequiste(s): Anthropology 1027A/B or Linguistics 2288A/B.
It is recommended that students take Anthropology 2247A/B and 2248A/B prior to this course.

2017-2018
Fall: Tue 11:30 am-1:30 pm and Thu 1:30-2:30 pm Classroom: UCC-66 Instructor: K. Pennesi

2245F - Anthropological Approaches to Language

Culture is investigated using linguistic methods and techniques. Topics include: the analysis of lexical sets, cognitive categories, language as a symbolic communicative process, non-verbal communication, conversational analysis. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequisite(s): One of: ANTH 1020E, ANTH 1025F/G, ANTH 1027A/B or LING 2288A/B.

2017-2018
Fall: Mon 1:30-4:30pm   Classroom: WL-258   Instructor: K. Pennesi

2250G - Verbal Art, Performance and Speech Play

This course examines the artful and playful use of spoken language in relation to social organization and cultural practices. Topics include: structures and patterns in speech play, participation of the audience in the performance, evaluation of competence, issues of authenticity and identity, and the tension between tradition and innovation. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequisite(s): One of: ANTH 1020E, ANTH 1027A/B, LING 2288A/B or permission from the instructor.

  • Course Outline
2017-2018
Winter: Tue 11:30 am-12:30pm and Thu 12:30-2:30pm   Classroom: UCC-66   Instructor: K. Pennesi

2251F - Language, Gender and Sexuality

This course can be taken for credit towards Anthropology and Linguistics modules. For a general interest course on this topic take 2151A.

This course explores the relationship between language and sex/gender systems from a critical linguistic anthropological perspective. Areas investigated include: language and gender stereotypes; gender variation in language usage; power and women’s status; and male vs female communicative styles in different contexts. An essay on a relevant topic is required. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2151A/B, Linguistics 2185A/B, 2286F/G, 2287F/G.
Prerequisite(s): One of: Anthropology 1020E, 1025F/G, 1027A/B or Women's Studies 1020E, 1021F/G.

2017-2018
Fall term: LEC Tue 1:30-3:30pm in UCC-67. TUT Thu 2:30-3:30 pm in SSC-3227 (updated Sept.11)  Instructor: T. Granadillo

2260G - "Nature" in the City

This course examines how changing notions of social control, sanitation, property value, class, security, and individual well-being have shaped the social production of green spaces in urban environments. We will also explore how green spaces are experienced by urban inhabitants and influence their imagination of the city. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 essay course.

2017-2018
Winter: Tue 12:30-2:30pm and Thu 12:30-1:30pm   Classroom: SSC-2024   Instructor: A. Premat

2264G - Issues in Primate Conservation

A consideration of conservation issues confronting primatologists, including: conservation assessment, variables for understanding the conservation biology of nonhuman primate populations, biogeographic patterns contributing to declining primate populations, strategies in primate conservation, and how ethnoprimatology – the study of interactions between humans and nonhuman primate populations – can be useful in primate conservation. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 essay course.

2017-2018
Winter: Tue 6:30-9:30pm   Classroom: SSC-3018   Instructor: I. Colquhoun

2272F/G - Anthropology of Tourism

This course examines various aspects of tourism from an anthropological point of view. Topics will include the cultural effects of tourism on both hosts and guests, on the political and economic issues involved in tourism, on the connection between tourism and environmental concerns, and on conflict over local resources. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequiste(s): At least a 0.5 essay course in any faculty.

2017-2018  Fall: Distance Studies    Instructor: S. Larkin
2017-2018  Winter: Distance Studies   Instructor: C. Kennedy

2281G - Anthropology of Development

Third World responses to development from an anthropological perspective, with emphasis on the impact of market institutions on indigenous societies. Topics include the impact of aid, wage labor and urbanization on peasant communities; local versus national priorities in development; and risk aversion and technological innovation among small farmers. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequiste(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 essay course.

2017-2018
Winter: Distance Studies   Instructor: S. Larkin

2283F - Refugees and the Displaced: An Anthropological Approach to Forced Migration

This course examines populations forcibly uprooted from their original habitats due to armed conflict, famine, environmental disasters and 'development.' It emphasizes the need to examine displacement in specific contexts. Topics include: the impact of displacement on society and culture, 'home' and exile, humanitarian aid, resistance and resilience in host-countries. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequiste(s): Any Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 essay course.

2017-2018
Fall: Tue 9:30 am-12:30 pm  Classroom: UCC-59   Instructor: R. Farah

2284G - Mobile Phones and the Internet

A comparative study of the role of new information and communications technologies in the developing world. Topics include: connectivity and access; adoptions and appropriations; communications in development; mobile phones and transnational migration; youth, gender and mobile technologies; the internet and popular politics; new technologies and expanded worlds. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): -
Prerequiste(s): -

2017-2018
Winter: Mon 1:30-2:30 and Wed 12:30-2:30  Classroom: HSB-11   Instructor: D. Jorgensen

2285G - Clothing and Culture: The Anthropology of Fashion

This course focuses on the anthropological study of clothing and fashion. It will critically examine the meaning of clothing and the role it plays in the formation of identities and the negotiation of power inequalities. It will further explore the social and political-economic processes that influence clothing production and consumption. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 2293G taken in 2015-2016.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 essay course.

2017-2018
Winter term:  Distance Studies   Instructor: C. Kennedy