3000-Level Courses

2018/2019

3237A-001  Field Techniques in Linguistics  (Professor Granadillo)

Students elicit and record linguistic data from a native speaker of a designated language and then study its phonological and lexical-grammatical systems. Selected aspects of the language are analyzed in terms of current problems in linguistic theory.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite: none
Prerequisites: Linguistics 2247A/B and Linguistics 2248A/B or the former Anthropology 2247A/B and the former Anthropology 2248A/B.

2018/2019
Fall:  Mon 1:30-2:30pm and Wed 1:30-3:30   Classroom: WL 258   Professor Granadillo

3305G-001  History, Territory and the Politics of Identity  (Professor Farah)

This course examines the reconstitution of identities as people reclaim histories and territories, challenging nation-states and traditional identity references. The course examines different situations through case studies in colonial and post-colonial societies. Key issues to be discussed include: memory/history; territory, displacement and deterritorialization; citizenship, nation and the state.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite: none
Prerequisites: Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 0.5 or 1.0 Essay course and registration in third year or higher in any program.

2018/2019
Winter: Tue 1:30-4:30pm   Classroom: SSC 3102   Professor Farah

3307A-001   Field Methods in Archaeology   (Professor Timmins)

This course provides a practical introduction to field methods and preliminary laboratory techniques of archaeology. Practical training will be given at a field camp to be held at an archaeological site near London. Lecture and lab. Application required.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite(s): none
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2229F/G and registration in Anthropology module Year 3 or 4. Application required.

2018/2019
Fall: Fri 8:30am-2:30pm    Location: Museum of Archaeology    Professor Timmins

3311G-001  Bioarchaeology: Practice and Theory  (Professor Nelson)

An introduction to current theoretical and methodological issues in bioarchaeology. Use of ancient human, animal, and plant tissues to reconstruct relationships among biology, culture and environment in international contexts is emphasized. Topics include: diet, demography, disease, identity, mobility, landscape, childhood, gender, ideology, political economy, violence, work, urbanism, and globalization.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite: none
Prerequisites: Anthropology 2226A/B or Anthropology 2229F/G or instructor's permission.

2018/2019
Winter: Tue 9:30am-12:30pm   Classroom: SSC 2257   Professor Nelson

3313B-001  Artifact Analysis  (New!)  (Professor Timmins)

This course provides students with a hands-on introduction to the identification, analysis and interpretation of a range of archaeological artifacts including lithics, ceramics and organics. Students will work with archaeological collections that are available for analysis.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite: none
Prerequisites: Anthropology 2229F/G or permission of the instructor.

2018/2019
Winter:  Thu 1:30-4:30pm   Classroom: SSC 3227  Professor Timmins

3325F/G   Readings in Anthropology

Individual reading and research of current interest in Anthropology. Students are responsible for making arrangements with an Anthropology faculty member. An application must be completed with approval from the Instructor and the Chair. Application required.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisites: none
Prerequisites: Registration in third year in any program with approval from the instructor and the Department Chair.

3336F-001  Debates in Human Evolution  (Professor Colquhoun)

This course provides an overview of the fossil evidence for human evolution as a background for the critical examination of controversies in the field. Areas to be explored include human taxonomy, the evolution of human behaviour and the origin of modern humans.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite: none
Prerequisites: Anthropology 2226A/B and registration in year 3 or 4 in any module.

2018/2019
Fall:  Thu 1:30-4:30pm   Classroom: SSC 2257   Professor Colquhoun

3338F-001  Skeletal Biology     (Professor Waters-Rist)

An exploration of the role that skeletal material plays in providing anthropological information. Emphasis will be placed on the analytical techniques used in osteology and odontology for: measuring biological adaptability in archaeological populations; creating individual biographies; the reconstruction of cultural activities.

1 lecture hour. 2 laboratory hours.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite: none
Prerequisites: Anthropology 2226F/G and registration in year 3 or 4 in any module.

2018/2019
Fall:  Tue 1:30-4:30pm   Classroom: SSC 2257   Professor Waters-Rist

3339G-001 Language Variation and Change (New!) (Professor Granadillo)

This course uses approaches from sociolinguistics and historical linguistics to explore topics related to variation across and within languages and linguistic changes over time. Topics covered may include: sound change, morphological change, syntactic change, linguistic reconstruction, variations according to class, gender, age, ethnicity, communities of practice, and place.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisite: none
Prerequisites: Linguistics 2247A/B or the former Anthropology 2247A/B and registration in third or fourth year of any Linguistics or Anthropology module.

2018/2019
Winter:  Fri 10:30am-1:30pm   Classroom: UCC 65   Professor Granadillo

  • Syllabus coming soon

3350F-001  Society and Culture I: Historical Perspectives  (Professor Clark)

This course explores where anthropology came from, what influenced its early questions, and how those questions evolved over time, through an examination of some classic anthropological work on society and culture.

This course and Anthropology 3351G replace the former Anthropology 3301E.

Credit value: 0.5
Antirequisites: The former Anthropology 3301E.
Prerequisites: Third or fourth year standing in any anthropology module.

2018/2019
Fall: Thu 9:30am-12:30pm   Classroom: SSC 2257    Professor Clark

3351G-001  Society and Culture II: Identity, Power and Social Formation  (Professor Clark)

This course examines the various principles through which societies are organized, by examining the construction of social formations and social identities over time in contexts of differential power. 3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.

This course and Anthropology 3350F replace the former Anthropology 3301E.

Antirequisites: The former Anthropology 3301E.
Prerequisites: Anthropology 3350F and third or fourth year standing in any anthropology module.

2018/2019
Winter: Thu 9:30am-12:30pm   Classroom: SSC 2257   Professor Clark

3355F-001 Zombies in Cultural and Historical Perspective (New!)  (Professor Beckett)

As one of the most popular monsters in film, zombies speak to us about our own desires and fears. This course locates the contemporary figure of the zombie in cultural and historical perspective, with specific focus on the zombie in Haitian and American cultures.

Antirequisites: none
Prerequisites: Registration in third or fourth year in any program.

2018/2019
Fall: Wed 10:30am-1:30pm   Classroom SEB 2099    Professor Beckett