2000-Level Courses

2019/2020

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2100-650  Archaeology and World Prehistory  (Prof Timmins)

The field of archaeology, with emphasis on the major discoveries of the discipline. Topics include the evolution of humans, their spread throughout the world, the origins of agriculture, urbanization, and the development of early civilizations. Major archaeological sites like Olduvai Gorge, Stonehenge, Giza, Ur and Teotihuacan will be discussed.

Course value: 1.0               Distance Studies

  • Ideal for students with no background in anthropology.
  • Only counts towards the Minor in Anthropology.

 

2101B-650  Great Archaeological Sites  (Prof Timmins)

 An examination of spectacular archaeological sites around the world, including many on the UNESCO World Heritage List. The course covers sites of complex hunter-gatherers and farmers, and early states and empires in Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Aegean, Asia and Mesoamerica, the Andes and the Classical World.

Course value: 0.5                    Distance Studies

  • Ideal for students with no background in anthropology
  • Only counts towards the Minor in Anthropology

 

  • Course Outline coming soon.

2151A-001  Language, Gender and Sexuality  (Prof Granadillo)

This course explores the relationship between language and sex/gender systems from a critical linguistic anthropology perspective. Areas investigated include: language and gender stereotypes; gender variation in language usage; power and women's status; and male vs female communicative styles in different contexts.

Credit value: 0.5             2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour

This course is the same course as ANTH 2251F. Students wanting to include this course in an anthropology or linguistics module should take 2251F.

2212G-001  Cultures of the Pacific (Prof Campbell)

The cultures of Polynesia, Micronesia and Melanesia with an emphasis on indigenous social structures. Other topics include ecology and economy, male-female relations, ritual and cosmology, hierarchical and egalitarian political systems, Pacific history, and contemporary political and economic issues.

Credit value: 0.5            3 lecture hours

This course is cross-listed (same as) with INDIGSTU 2212G-650.

  • Course Outline coming soon.

2216F-650  Cultures of Latin America  (Prof Premat)

The cultural history of Latin American societies. Topics include the historical formation of indigenous communities, and a wide variety of contemporary social problems in Latin America.

Credit value: 0.5            Distance Studies

This course is cross-listed (same as) with INDIGSTU 2216F-650.

2222F-200  Debates in Sociocultural Anthropology  (Prof Premat)

Sociocultural Anthropologists commonly debate the foundations of their discipline. What are the goals of Sociocultural Anthropology? How should we be doing it, and why? For whom do we do it? This course contextualizes such key debates focusing especially on what they tell us about the discipline's past, present, and future.

Credit value: 0.5            Blended format: 2 lecture hours, 1 online hour.

2226B-001  Biological Anthropology  (Prof Colquhoun)

A survey of the major areas of biological anthropology, including heredity, paleo-anthropology, human adaptability and variability, and growth and development.

Credit value: 0.5              3 lecture hours

  • Course Outline coming soon.

2229F-001  Principles of Archaeology  (Prof Ferris)

This course provides an overview of the goals, theory and analytical methods of archaeology as practised by anthropologists. The course serves to provide a basic appreciation of how one is able to go from the material remains of past peoples to statements about the nature of their cultural systems, and also, how archaeologists are uniquely poised to address certain general questions of concern to all anthropologists.

Credit value: 0.5           3 lecture hours

2233F-001  Archaeology of Ontario and the Great Lakes  (Prof Timmins)

The prehistoric societies of Ontario and surrounding areas. Topics include the entry of humans into the New World and their arrival in Ontario; development of agriculture; appearance of historic period societies such as the Huron, Neutral and Ojibwa; impact of European settlement and economic systems on native societies.

Credit value: 0.5          3 lecture hours

This course is cross-listed (the same) with INDIGSTU 2233F-001.

2236B-001  Anthropological Perspectives on Human Growth, Development and Aging (Prof Nelson)

This course examines the growth, development and aging of the human body using evolutionary, comparative and cross-cultural approaches. We will draw on practical methods from bioarchaeology and forensics, theoretical perspectives from biological evolution and evolutionary ecology, cultural aspects from cultural anthropology, and clinical perspectives from modern medical studies.

Credit value: 0.5             3 lecture hours

  • Course Outline coming soon.

2237A-001  Human Adaptability and Resilience: Life at the Extremes (Prof Stock)

Humans are a remarkably adaptable species who have colonized almost all regions of our planet. This course examines the mechanisms that underlie our adaptability, including human biological diversity, the ways we adapt to environmental stress, and the resilience of our species in response to rapid environmental and cultural change.

Credit value: 0.5             2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour

2238B-001  Reading Life and Death through the Human Body (Prof Waters-Rist)

While alive our bodily tissues store a tremendous amount of information. These clues can be used to tell a lot about a person’s life and death. This information is explored in three contexts: Living Individuals, Recently Deceased Individuals (focus on forensic applications), and Older Deceased Individuals (focus on archaeological applications).

Credit value: 0.5            3 lecture hours

  • Course Outline coming soon.

2245G-001  Anthropological Approaches to Language  (Prof Pennesi)

Introduces theories and methods of linguistic anthropology. Topics include: the relationship between language and thought, connections between linguistic practices and social categories, the role of language in cultural practices.

Credit value: 0.5               3 lecture hours

  • Course Outline coming soon.

2250F-001  Verbal Art, Performance and Speech Play  (Prof Pennesi)

This course examines the artful and playful use of spoken language in relation to social organization and cultural practices. Topics include: structures and patterns in speech play, participation of the audience in the performance, evaluation of competence, issues of authenticity and identity, and the tension between tradition and innovation.

Course value: 0.5              3 lecture hours

2251F-001  Language, Gender and Sexualty  (Prof Granadillo)

This course explores the relationship between language and sex/gender systems from a critical linguistic anthropological perspective. Areas investigated include: language and gender stereotypes; gender variation in language usage; power and women's status; and male vs female communicative styles in different contexts. An essay on a relevant topic is required.

Credit value: 0.5            2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour

This course is cross-listed (the same) with ANTH 2151A-001. Students wanting to include this course in an anthropology or linguistics module should take 2251F.

2264G-001  Issues in Primate Conservation  (Prof Colquhoun)

A consideration of conservation issues confronting primatologists, including: conservation assessment, variables for understanding the conservation biology of nonhuman primate populations, biogeographic patterns contributing to declining primate populations, strategies in primate conservation, and how ethnoprimatology - the study of interactions between humans and nonhuman primate populations - can be useful in primate conservation.

Credit value: 0.5               3 lecture hours

  • Course Outline coming soon.

2265F-650  Primate Behaviour  (Prof Colquhoun)

This course considers the behavioral patterns, and diversity, exhibited across species of the Order Primates. Critical examination of theoretical models developed to explain primate behavior is emphasized. Topics covered, using species comparisons, include socioecological contexts of primate behavior, reproduction, growth and development, kinship and dominance, communication and cognition.

Credit value: 0.5             Distance Studies

2267B-650  Anthropology of Zoos  (Prof Colquhoun)

Modern zoos characterize themselves as key players in conserving endangered species. But, is this message getting across to zoo visitors? This course utilizes anthropological and interdisciplinary approaches to assess key aspects of zoo-based conservation action, and the extent to which zoos can generate public engagement in 21st century conservation concerns.

Credit value: 0.5            Distance Studies

  • Course Outline coming soon.

2272F-650  Anthropology of Tourism  (Prof Puppe)

This course examines various aspects of tourism from an anthropological point of view. Topics will include the cultural effects of tourism on both hosts and guests, on the political and economic issues involved in tourism, on the connection between tourism and environmental concerns, and on conflict over local resources.

Credit value: 0.5              Distance Studies

2272G-650  Anthropology of Tourism  (Prof Kennedy)

This course examines various aspects of tourism from an anthropological point of view. Topics will include the cultural effects of tourism on both hosts and guests, on the political and economic issues involved in tourism, on the connection between tourism and environmental concerns, and on conflict over local resources.

Credit value: 0.5             Distance Studies

2277F-001  Anthropology of Distaster  (NEW!)  (Prof Beckett)

This course explores anthropological approaches to the study of crisis, disaster, and emergency. We will look at theoretical frameworks for understanding disaster and apply them to case studies of disasters ranging from fires and hurricane to earthquakes and humanitarian emergencies.

Credit value: 0.5

2285G-650  Clothing and Culture: The Anthropology of Fashion (Prof Kennedy)

This course focuses on the anthropological study of clothing and fashion. It will critically examine the meaning of clothing and the role it plays in the formation of identities and the negotiation of power inequalities. It will further explore the social and political-economic processes that influence clothing production and consumption.

Credit value: 0.5            Distance Studies