Summer 2022

This summer, Anthropology will be offering five fully online (asynchronous) courses - our three introductory first-year courses, as well as two senior level courses. Click on each one below for information.

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Students will be able to register for summer courses beginning February 22nd through Student Centre. For information with regards to summer term activation and registration, please visit the Office of the Registrar website.

Course outlines will be posted once they’re available. In the meantime, don’t hesitate to email us with any questions at anthro-ugrad-office@uwo.ca.  

ANTH 1025G-650  Introduction to Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology

Second term 0.5 course, 6 weeks  June 20 to July 29  Instructor: K. Linton

Course Outline

This essay course introduces basic concepts in the study of Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology. It focuses on aspects of social organization, culture and language that are shared by all humans, as well as on the diverse ways in which people in our own society and around the world live, organize themselves, use language, and understand what is ‘normal’. Through lectures from specialists, engaging assignments, and practical applications of anthropological methods, students are given the unparalleled opportunity to study and reflect on the many ways of being human.

Specific questions addressed in this course include:

What is culture, and what is the relationship between language and culture?

How do social relationships and linguistic practice shape people’s lives in different cultural contexts?

How is language used to accomplish social goals?

What is exchange, and how can it be understood as fundamental to both social and economic life?

Why do social identities matter to people, and what role does language play in shaping people’s identities?

How do sociocultural and linguistic anthropologists do their research, and in what ways is this research important and applicable in the world today?

ANTH 1026F-650  Introduction to Biological Anthropology and Archaeology

First term 0.5 course, 6 weeks  May 9 to June 17  Instructor: K. Olsen

Course Outline

This essay course introduces aspects of Biological Anthropology and Archaeology that help us to understand the place of humankind in nature and global history. Topics covered in this course include: heredity, human evolution and variability, archaeological methods, the development of culture, mortuary practices, the domestication of plants and animals, and the rise of complex societies and the state. Through lectures from specialists, engaging assignments, and practical applications of anthropological methods, students are given the unparalleled opportunity to study and reflect on the many ways of being human.

Specific questions addressed in this course include:

How did our species originate, and how can we understand human variation?

What can we learn from studying bones, seeds, archaeological sites and other remains of past lives?

What can we learn from people from studying the social lives of chimps, gorillas, lemurs, and other non-human primates?

How do forensic anthropologists and bioarchaeologists study human bodies, and what can they learn from such research?

What can archaeological sites and artifacts teach us about the gender roles, political systems, and social organization of people in the past? How do biological anthropologists and archaeologists do their research, and in what ways is this research important and applicable in the world today?

ANTH 1027A-650  Introduction to Linguistics

0.5 course, 12 weeks  May 9 to July 29  Instructor: P. Gauthier

In this non-essay course, students will be introduced to many different languages as we examine similarities and differences among them. Linguistics is the scientific study of human language: how it works, patterns, structures, processes of change. Linguists study language as a system of thought and communication by examining particular languages and comparing them. Students will learn the basic concepts in the main areas of linguistics: phonetics (sound systems), phonology (sound patterns), morphology (word formation), syntax (sentence structure) and semantics (word and sentence meaning). In addition, we will explore the changes in language. This course trains students to recognize patterns in language and to solve analytical problems using both systematic and creative thinking tng them.

Specific questions addressed in this course include:

What patterns and structures are apparent in how languages work?

What can we learn from examining particular languages and from comparing them?

How do we study and account for language change?

Please note: this course is a prerequisite for subsequent linguistics courses in the Linguistic Anthropology Major and/or the Interfaculty Program in Linguistics. https://www.uwo.ca/linguistics/

ANTH 1027A/B is antirequisite to Linguistics 2288A/B and therefore both cannot be taken.

ANTH 2276B-650  The Anthropology of Music

Second term 0.5 course, 6 weeks  June 20 to July 29  Instructor: K. Olsen

Course Outline

Prerequisites: none.

This non-essay course explores music as an aspect of culture in both present and past societies, focusing especially on how music is used to negotiate individual and collective identities in multiple contexts around the world and through time. The methods and issues relating to the ethnographic study of music behaviours are important components of the course.

Specific questions addressed in this course may include:

How have humans created and used different kinds of music through time?

What can we learn about humanity from different musical traditions around the world?

What role does music play in how individuals and groups think of themselves in relation to others in the past and present?

What role does music play in human experiences of the sacred and supernatural?

How do anthropologists study the importance of music in past and present human societies?

This course is open to all students who have completed their first-year requirements. Students do not need to have a background in Anthropology to take this course.

ANTH 2281F-650 Anthropology of International Development

First term 0.5 course, 6 weeks  May 9 to June 17  Instructor: K. Linton

Course Outline

Prerequisites: none

This essay course will introduce students to an anthropological perspective on international development, focusing especially on the impact of international aid, global markets, and urbanization on marginalized communities in different parts of the world, and on the effects of overlooking local priorities in national and international development plans.

Specific questions addressed in this course may include: What does “development” mean to different people in the world today?

How are plans for “improving” marginal communities implemented in the world today, and what does anthropological research concerning these communities reveal about this process?

How might critical perspectives on international development contribute to alternative ways of providing support to marginalized communities?

What has anthropological research revealed about the complexities of working with, for or around international development organizations?

This course is open to all students who have completed their first-year requirements at Western. Students do not need to have a background in Anthropology to take this course.